Criminal Appeals

For criminal appeals in Texas, every case will have what is called the "Trial Court's Certification of Defendant's Right Of Appeal." Under this section, there will be several options. The option that applies usually has a check mark next to it, indicating the defendant's right to appeal. Here are the options:

"is not a plea-bargain case, and the defendant has the right of appeal."

"is a plea-bargain case, but matters were raised by written motion filed and ruled on before trial and not withdrawn or waived, and the defendant has the right of appeal."

"is a plea-bargain case, but the trial court has given permission to appeal, and the defendant has the right of appeal."

"is a plea-bargain case, and the defendant has NO right of appeal."

"the defendant has waived the right of appeal."

The most common option is "a plea-bargain case, and the defendant has NO right of appeal."

The most common appeals are direct appeals and writs. A writ is typically used when there is no possibility of direct appeal.

Options For Criminal Appeal

Depending on the specific facts of the case, the defendant can usually seek relief through motions, direct appeal or writ. Which one is applicable to you depends on what occurred in the criminal case.

Keep in mind that defendants are typically on a strict timeline to file certain motions to preserve their appeals.

Federal Criminal Appeals

Typically, if a person is going through state court, he or she must exhaust all available appeal options at the state level before moving to the federal appeals process.

Contact Us For Experienced Representation In Criminal Appeals

Call Matthew Pillado PLLC at 800-672-3911 to learn more or complete our online contact form.

Based in Hurst, we represent individuals throughout Tarrant County and the Dallas-Fort Worth area.